Home
Videos like this “Why are women paid less than men? | The Economist”
Jordan Peterson discusses whether men and women can ever be equal
 
09:27
Psychologist and author Jordan Peterson discusses notions of gender equality with the Wright Stuff panel including Sophie Walker, leader of the Women's Equality Party. The Wright Stuff is on television every weekday at 9:15am until 11:15am, Channel 5. To watch full episodes, visit https://www.my5.tv/the-wright-stuff/season-2018 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/officialwrightstuff/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/5WrightStuff Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5wrightstuff/ #wrightstuff
Was Karl Marx right? | The Economist
 
03:23
Karl Marx remains surprisingly relevant 200 years after his birth. He rightly predicted some of the pitfalls of capitalism, but his solution was far worse than the disease. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2FEY1tD Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2FE3sJB Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2FDEbiA Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2FHCzVe Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2FFx4Gi Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2FEbDWi
Views: 472295 The Economist
The world if robots take our jobs | The Economist
 
04:09
Computers are taking on increasingly sophisticated tasks, a trend which will cost many people their jobs. With so much automation to come, how many humans will still be needed? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films every day of the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 58558 The Economist
Elon Musk's hyperloop could revolutionise public transport | The Economist
 
05:10
Elon Musk's Hyperloop technology has the potential to revolutionise the way we travel. In a contest he held in Los Angeles, some of the world's brightest engineers gathered to find the best way to make this billionaire's pipe dream a reality. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Elon Musk, the billionaire behind Tesla Motors and SpaceX, wants to revolutionise public transport. In 2017 he held an event at SpaceX's California headquarters showcasing the latest technology for what he believes is the future of intercity travel. An entirely new transport system, called Hyperloop. "What this is all about is advancing the state of transportation; trying new things that have never been done before that can make an incredible difference to peoples lives." But is Hyperloop ready to usher in a new age of mass transit or is it just a billionaire's pipe dream? In 1829 a competition was held to find the best locomotive engine for the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, in northern England. George Stephenson's Rocket won first prize, posting a top speed of 38km per hour. Widely credited as the world's first steam locomotive the Rocket transformed how people travelled between cities. Almost two centuries on, Musk is hosting the modern-day equivalent of that competition and teams of engineers from around the world have come to Los Angeles to compete, head-to-head. The aim is to bring Hyperloop one step closer to reality. But what exactly is Hyperloop? Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 432568 The Economist
Does the Gender Pay Gap Really Exist? | Good Morning Britain
 
07:55
Subscribe now for more! http://bit.ly/1NbomQa Dr Joana Williams and Sophie Walker take part in a fiery debate on whether the gender pay gap really exists. Broadcast on 15/01/2018 Like, follow and subscribe to Good Morning Britain! The Good Morning Britain YouTube channel delivers you the news that you’re waking up to in the morning. From exclusive interviews with some of the biggest names in politics and showbiz to heartwarming human interest stories and unmissable watch again moments. Join Susanna Reid, Piers Morgan, Ben Shephard, Kate Garraway, Charlotte Hawkins and Sean Fletcher every weekday on ITV from 6am. Website: http://bit.ly/1GsZuha YouTube: http://bit.ly/1Ecy0g1 Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1HEDRMb Twitter: http://bit.ly/1xdLqU3 http://www.itv.com
Views: 185554 Good Morning Britain
Why China and India face a marriage crisis | The Economist
 
02:51
China and India - home to a third of humanity – both face a marriage crisis that will last for generations. A mere five years ago marriage patterns were normal in the two countries. Now in China 50m ‘guanggun’ – ‘bare branches’ – look doomed to bachelor-dom, while in India 500 year-old laws are being revised to allow men to marry out of caste, village and state. What has lead to this marriage squeeze? First, millions women have gone “missing”. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women. If China had had a normal sex ratio at birth, its female population in 2010 would have been 720m. In fact, it was only 655m, compared with almost 705m men and boys—50m surplus husbands. Fertility rates then accentuate this distortion. When a country’s fertility rate is going down (as in India) younger cohorts of people will tend to be smaller than older ones. If men are older than women at marriage, as they usually are, there will be fewer potential brides than husbands because women will have been born later, when fertility is lower. Then there is a queuing effect. Men who cannot find a wife right away go on looking, and competing with younger men. As a result, the number of unmarried men piles up, as in a queue. By 2060, there could be more than 160 Chinese and Indian men wanting to marry for every 100 women. This is a ferocious squeeze in countries where marriage has always been a basic requirement for being a full member of society. It could be hugely harmful. Almost everywhere, large numbers of single men are associated with high rates of crime and violence. No one really knows how these two giant countries will react.
Views: 896650 The Economist
Kids Explain: Adultery
 
03:56
Infamous cheating website Ashley Madison was hacked recently. If the information of its users gets released, millions of marriages could be at stake. That would be hardest on the kids because they’re too young to understand this sort of thing. Case in point, we went out on the street and asked kids to explain what adultery is in our latest edition of #KidsExplain. SUBSCRIBE to get the latest #KIMMEL: http://bit.ly/JKLSubscribe Watch the latest Halloween Candy Prank: http://bit.ly/KimmelHalloweenCandy Watch Mean Tweets: http://bit.ly/JKLMeanTweets8 Connect with Jimmy Kimmel Live Online: Visit the Jimmy Kimmel Live WEBSITE: http://bit.ly/JKLWebsite Like Jimmy Kimmel Live on FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/JKLFacebook Follow Jimmy Kimmel Live on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/JKLTwitter Follow Jimmy Kimmel Live on INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/JKLInstagram About Jimmy Kimmel Live: Jimmy Kimmel serves as host and executive producer of Emmy-winning "Jimmy Kimmel Live," ABC's late-night talk show. "Jimmy Kimmel Live" is well known for its huge viral video successes with 2.5 billion views on YouTube alone. Some of Kimmel's most popular comedy bits include - Mean Tweets, Lie Witness News, Jimmy's Twerk Fail Prank, Unnecessary Censorship, YouTube Challenge, The Baby Bachelor, Movie: The Movie, Handsome Men's Club, Jimmy Kimmel Lie Detective and music videos like "I (Wanna) Channing All Over Your Tatum" and a Blurred Lines parody with Robin Thicke, Pharrell, Jimmy and his security guard Guillermo. Now in its thirteenth season, Kimmel's guests have included: Johnny Depp, Meryl Streep, Tom Cruise, Halle Berry, Harrison Ford, Jennifer Aniston, Will Ferrell, Katy Perry, Tom Hanks, Scarlett Johansson, Channing Tatum, George Clooney, Larry David, Charlize Theron, Mark Wahlberg, Kobe Bryant, Steve Carell, Hugh Jackman, Kristen Wiig, Jeff Bridges, Jennifer Garner, Ryan Gosling, Bryan Cranston, Jamie Foxx, Amy Poehler, Ben Affleck, Robert Downey Jr., Jake Gyllenhaal, Oprah, and unfortunately Matt Damon. Kids Explain: Adultery https://youtu.be/lIO4UgtcAm4
Views: 7951516 Jimmy Kimmel Live
The Progressive Income Tax: A Tale of Three Brothers
 
05:00
"The Progressive Income Tax" is one of those economic terms that gets bandied about, but few actually know what it means or how it works. This tale of three similar brothers with three different incomes (but one shared expense) helps explain the tax system under which we live. Adapted from an article by noted investor and economist, Kip Hagopian, and narrated by actress Carolyn Hennesy of "General Hospital" and "True Blood" fame, this animated story will change the way you think about how you pay your taxes.  Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: Once upon a time, there were three brothers, triplets, named Tom, Dick, and Harry Class. They were raised in the same home, with the same parents, had the same IQ, same skills and same opportunities. Each was married and had two children. They were all carpenters making $25 per hour. While they were very similar in all these respects, they had different priorities. For example, Tom, chose to work 20 hours per week, while his brother, Dick worked 40 hours and Harry 60. It should also be noted that Harry's wife worked full time as an office manager for a salary of $50,000. Dick's wife sold real estate part time 10 hours a week and made $25,000 per year. Tom's wife did not work. Tom and Dick spent all of their family income. Since they paid into Social Security they figured, they didn't need to save for retirement. Harry and his wife, on the other hand, had, over many years, put away money each month and invested it in stocks and bonds. Here's how it worked out: Tom made $25,000 a year, Dick and his wife made $75,000 and Harry and his wife, $150,000. When a new housing development opened up in their community, the brothers decided to buy equally-priced homes on the same private street. One day the brothers decided to pool their funds for the purpose of improving their street. Concerned about crime and safety, and wanting a more attractive setting for their homes, the three families decided to install a security gate at the street's entrance; repave the street's surface; and enhance the lighting and landscaping. The work was done for a total cost of $30,000. Harry assumed they would divide the bill three ways, each brother paying $10,000. But Tom and Dick objected. "Why should we pay the same as you?" they said. "You make much more money than we do." Harry was puzzled. "What does that have to do with anything?" he asked. "My family makes more money because my wife and I work long hours, and because we have saved some of the money we've earned to make additional money from investments. Why should we be penalized for that?" "Harry, you can work and save all you like" Tom countered. "But my wife and I want to enjoy ourselves now, not 25 years from now." "Fine, Tom. Do what you want. It's a free country. But why should I have to pay for that? "I can't believe your being so... unbrotherly," Tom argued. "You have a lot of money and I don't. I thought you'd be more generous." At this point, Dick, the peacemaker in the family, entered the conversation. "I've got an idea," Dick said. "Our combined income is $250,000, and $30,000 is 12 percent of that amount. Why don't we each pay that percentage of our income? Under that formula, Tom would pay $3,000, I would pay $9,000, and Harry would pay $18,000." "I have a much better idea," said Tom. "And one that's fairer than what you're proposing." For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/progressive-income-tax-tale-three-brothers
Views: 10375924 PragerU
Xi Jinping, China's president, is the world's most powerful man | The Economist
 
03:35
Is Xi Jinping the worlds most powerful man? The world's balance of power is shifting. For the past five years president Xi Jinping, China's leader, has ruled with an iron fist and has been pursing a new model of great power relations. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Xi Jinping rules the most populous country, home to 1.4 billion people. Mr Xi is the most powerful Chinese leader since chairman Mao. He has purged the communist party and much of the army, rooting out corruption, replacing potential rivals with allies, and chocking any sign of dissent. China is the world's second largest economy and an engine of global growth. It is the biggest trade partner of many other countries and the second biggest of both America and the EU. China is building powerful armed forces constructing artificial islands in the South China Sea that look like military bases. Its ships have conducted military drills in the Mediterranean and Baltic Seas, and china has opened its first overseas naval base in Djibouti. America still has the bigger economy and more military muscle but president Donald Trump is struggling at home and he scorns the values and alliances that strengthen America abroad. As a result, Mr Xi can project himself as the champion of world order, taking the lead on globalisation and climate change. But Mr Xi also faces problems. Economic growth is slowing and inequality is rising. China's middle class wants better housing, education and health care, and more freedom. For now Mr Xi may now have more clout than Mr Trump but his power relies on repression and this kind of power is fragile. one man-rule may be dangerous and unstable. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 251018 The Economist
Donald Trump’s tax reforms, cartooned | The Economist
 
02:20
The Republican tax bill might be hard to swallow. In his latest drawing, our cartoonist KAL gives his take on the upcoming reforms. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2BEKW5Y A controversial tax reform package is up for a vote in the US Congress. It will have important long-term effects for the US and world economy. Kal's job is to wrestle the nerdy subject into drawn lines and laughs, and here's what Kal need to consider. Tax cuts and small government are orthodoxy for the Republican Party but even supporters are concerned about this massive and largely unpopular bill. Republicans have been hurrying to pass the legislation while the party has a lock on Congress and the presidency. They've bypassed hearings, avoided scrutiny and ignored economists who warned of trouble. And at over 500 pages, the bill is packed with a smorgasbord of goodies and baddies, many of which are just being discovered on the eve of the vote. The chief chef of this fast-food fest is none other than Donald Trump. He is desperate to get a legislative victory before his first year in office is out. Although Mr Trump and his businesses are poised to profit from the bill it's unlikely that the attention-deprived president has read the entire legislation. It now seems possible that America and the world will have to face the consequences. A result that may be hard to swallow. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2BFAriE Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2BGpXiY Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2BGPKaR Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2BFAuek Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2BFAvio
Views: 57803 The Economist
Brexit could end the age of "Cool Britannia" | The Economist
 
05:45
Brexit is not only a concern for Britain’s economic future, it’s also threatening the country’s “street cred”: 2018 could mark the end of “Cool Britannia”. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2zF0LIE Could 2018 be the year Britain loses its cool? By autumn, the complex Brexit negotiations should be drawing to a close. Deal or no deal, what's decided before then will affect the future of Britain, and the continent, for decades to come. As Brexit begins to bite, not only is Britain's economic future in play but the country could lose its "street cred". 20 years ago, Britain was riding on the crest of a wave of cool; Britpop ruled the airwaves, and the young, newly elected, Prime Minister Tony Blair, was pledging to build a new Britain. 20 years on from Blair’s iconic address, Theresa May took to the stage at her conservative party conference, to deliver a less successful speech. As the ruling Conservative Party battles with Brexit, it's looking less cool than ever. And the poorly prepared Brexit negotiations aren’t doing much to improve their image. And all this could have a significant impact on how Britain is viewed by the rest of Europe. Britain's thriving creative industries currently generate $84 billion every year. That's over 4% of GDP. There's a danger London could start losing out on the world's best creative talents. But the vote for Brexit in June 2016 has so far done a lot less economic damage than many expected. Consumer spending and business investment have held up. The employment rate is at a record high and although wage growth has been poor the jobs market has been running hot. Hardline Brexiteers suggest the country has nothing to fear if the prime minister walks away without a deal. Yet this would bring gale warnings for economy. So far, British businesses have been surprisingly resilient to this uncertainty. But if a no-deal Brexit looks increasingly likely, investment could suffer and things would take a turn for the worse. If Britain leaves without a deal, it risks becoming not only a poorer country but a far more isolated one. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2zDKGTA Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2zG8ypu Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2zF6bmW Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2zERXTm Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2zCvrKx
Views: 225314 The Economist
Populism is reshaping our world | The Economist
 
15:10
From the streets of Turin to Silicon Valley, people power is taking the world by storm. With frustrations rising and the old order apparently crumbling, who really has the answers? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 December 2016 Italy's populist opposition is shaking up the establishment. They're days away from a referendum that could spell the end for the Italian government and make it the latest domino in the toppling international order. Around the world populist leaders are connecting with voters fed up with politics as usual and exploiting anger at an establishment out of touch with ordinary people. But giving voice to people's frustrations is one thing, offering them real answers is quite another. Five Star's anti-establishment message is resonating with voters. It is now Italy's biggest opposition party. The country has been crippled by recession and stagnating wages. With rates of inequality among the highest in Europe many people feel left behind by globalization and let down by political leaders. Now the populists sense there may be an opportunity to bring those leaders down. A referendum on constitutional reform has become a vote of confidence in the ruling elite. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has said he will resign if the country votes no. He's the latest politician to find himself in the firing line. Tonight, thousands of five-star supporters are gathering at a rally in Turin. Some are starting to ask what they might do with success. Beppe Grillo has vowed to get rid of political parties but he certainly knows how to start one. Grillo's success has come through impassioned charges against the corrupt elites and global forces he blames for Italy's woes but five stars leaders may soon have a harder note to hear. A question of how they would tackle unemployment and inequality. Two days after the rally Italians overwhelmingly voted no in the referendum. Prime Minister Renzi made good on his promise to stand down. It's another victory for populism as across the world charismatic leaders defy expectations. They're finding success selling deceptively simple answers to difficult questions. They almost always blame the failings of free trade and mass migration for rising inequality but is this the right target? Few cities are immune to the uneven impact of globalization. The latest venture from a San Francisco startup has the potential to turn one of America's most iconic industries on its head. Last year Uber paid $680 million for Otto, a company whose technology could fundamentally change trucking forever. It allows a truck to drive down a highway with nobody at the wheel. The company claims it could save the industry billions of dollars a year, reduce emissions by a third and eliminate the driver errors that cause up to 87% of truck crashes. But this bright sounding future has a dark side. A series of studies have found technology, not globalization, to be the biggest driver of inequality in developed countries. There were three and a half million people employed in trucking in America and with their industry seemingly the next in line for automation many face an uncertain future. As inequality grows in Western democracies, wealthy California has become one of the most economically unequal states in America as technology has displaced many lower skilled jobs. An alienated public turned on the establishment because it failed to provide answers. As some tech giants become as powerful as that establishment, it's a lesson they're starting to learn. So they're going back to school. For too many people in western democracies progress is still something that happens to other people. Wealth does not spread itself. An underclass appears beyond help, finding a way to reconnect with them and provide an alternative to populism will be at the top of the agenda for the political and business leaders of tomorrow THE AGENDA explores the defining questions of our time and seeks out the stories, solutions and the personalities who might just hold the answers. Discover the mould-breakers experimenting with new ways to approach some of the modern world's most fundamental issues; find out what happens when bold ideas and real life collide, and meet the leaders whose thoughts and actions are themselves helping to shape the agenda. Series One of The Agenda: People Power gets to grips with the rise of populism and what lies behind it. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 740143 The Economist
We know women get paid less than men, but why?
 
05:29
Planet America’s Chas Licciardello investigates whether there are any real reasons for the gender pay gap between men and women.
Views: 5628 ABC News (Australia)
Jordan Peterson vs The Gender Pay Gap
 
17:11
JBP takes on female host from Channel 4 debating the reasons for the wage gap. Dr. Jordan B Peterson is a Professor of Psychology, a clinical psychologist, a public speaker and a creator of Self Authoring. Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMcjxSThD54&t=13s
Views: 1364409 ManOfAllCreation
How free electricity would change the world | The Economist
 
03:20
Imagine if heating and powering homes became free in the next decade. What would that mean for the world? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2AjsewG Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2AkclGr Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2AkG55V Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2AmzzLK Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2AkD1Xk Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2AlTafr
Views: 67955 The Economist
Watch: Pay equality debate gets heated
 
10:28
Labour MP Stella Creasy and Kate Andrews from the Institute of Economic Affairs clash over the #PayMeToo campaign. #PayEquality #Feminism SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-News-for-iPad/id422583124 iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-news/id316391924?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bskyb.skynews.android&hl=en_GB
Views: 345072 Sky News
Can extreme poverty ever be eradicated? | The Economist
 
03:20
Poverty rates have fallen faster in the past 30 years than at any other time on record. The UN wants extreme poverty to disappear by 2030. We assess the data to see if this is achievable. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2AfBchr It is estimated that somebody escapes extreme poverty every 1.2 seconds. According to the World Bank, anyone on less than $1.90 per day is living in extreme poverty unable to afford basic food, clothing, healthcare and shelter. Absolute poverty rates have fallen faster in the past 30 years than in any other time on record. This is a remarkable achievement but the task of taking people put of the worst poverty remains a huge challenge. The impressive fall is the result of changes in just two countries, China and India. In the 1980s the majority of people in both of these countries were living in extreme poverty. But now the share of the poorest has fallen to 21% in India, and less than 2% in China. Increased productivity in farms and a mass migration from poor rural areas to the booming cities enabled many Chinese and Indian people to better their lives. Asia is moving into a new phase but can other parts of the world copy their model of moving people to factory jobs in cities? Today, more than half the world's poorest people live in sub-Saharan Africa. The percentage of the African population living in extreme poverty fell from 54% in 1990, to 41% in 2013. But in that same time period, the population of sub-Saharan Africa boomed meaning the total number of poor people rose from 276m to almost 400m. The population of sub-Saharan Africa is predicted to reach 2bn by 2050 and a large percentage of those people are likely to be extremely poor. And unlike Asia, a transformation of this region is unlikely to happen soon. Sub-Saharan Africa is urbanising faster than any other place on earth. But moving into the cities is not providing the same ladder out of poverty as it did in Asia. A lack of infrastructure, public transport, and essential services in many African cities prevents poor people from finding jobs and getting an education. The rapidly growing population only makes mater worse by putting further strain on resources. Millions of poor people in sub-Saharan Africa live far below the World Bank's threshold of $1.90 per day. That means it will be harder to pull them out of extreme poverty. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2AdErpF Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2AexPY4 Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2Af0pIv Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2AdA4ut Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2AdXK26
Views: 51157 The Economist
Do Women Earn Less than Men? - Learn Liberty
 
04:01
Are women discriminated against in the workplace? Looking at the data, women on average earn an annual wage that is approximately 75% that of men, which many people believe is the result of discrimination. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP However, when Prof. Steve Horwitz analyzes the data more closely, he finds that women make certain choices, such as career selection and raising children, which tend to result in lower wages than men. These choices could be the result of personal preferences or sexist cultural expectations for women's work, though the relative influence of these two factors remains unclear. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP FOLLOW US: - Website: https://www.learnliberty.org/ - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnLiberty - Twitter: https://twitter.com/LearnLiberty - Google +: http://bit.ly/1hi66Zz LEARN MORE: -Cities Where Women Outearn Male Counterparts: http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2010/09/01/cities-where-women-outearn-male-counterparts/ -An Analysis of Reasons for the Disparity in Wages Between Men and Women:http://www.consad.com/content/reports/Gender%20Wage%20Gap%20Final%20Report.pdf -Diana Furchtgott-Roth's testimony before the Joint Economic Committee in 2010: http://jec.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?a=Files.Serve&File_id=2a1f8ad4-f649-4ad3-a742-268d946962db LEARN LIBERTY Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://bit.ly/1UleLbP
Views: 1280804 Learn Liberty
The surprising neuroscience of gender inequality | Janet Crawford | TEDxSanDiego
 
12:39
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Janet Crawford dives into the unconscious associations that are often made with regard to gender. It’s hard not to reflect on our own unconscious associations as she talks through how our brain creates associations to help us make sense of the world. Her empowering talk speaks to men and women alike, challenging us all to help create the shift from one of blame to one of action through engagement and curiosity. Janet Crawford is Principal of Cascadance and Founder of the Women and Innovation Lab. Combining insights from neuroscience, evolutionary biology, and experimental psychology, she helps leaders build productive, innovative and collaborative corporate cultures. With two decades of experience coaching and consulting for Fortune 500 companies, her client organizations span the who’s who of Silicon Valley and beyond. Janet holds a Masters from Stanford University and a BA from UC Berkeley. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 237133 TEDx Talks
Why is Mecca having an $80bn makeover? | The Economist
 
02:06
Saudi Arabia is investing billions of dollars remodeling Mecca, home of Islam’s holiest site—the Kaaba. Its plans include building the world’s largest hotel. The aim is to double Mecca's capacity to host worshippers, to nearly seven million, by 2040. The redevelopment has destroyed scores of old shrines. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 557970 The Economist
A plan for Palestine's peace and prosperity | The Economist
 
04:17
Can Palestine become a prosperous and peaceful region? Munib al-Masri is the richest Palestinian in the world and he has a four-point plan to rebuild his homeland. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2ATg55H This man is known as “The Godfather of Palestine'. He’s a self made billionaire. Munib al-Masri is the richest man in Palestine and also one of the most influential. For more than 40 years he’s acted as mediator in Arab-Israeli peace talks. Now, at the age of 83, Mr Masri believes he has the formula to make his homeland prosper on the world stage. This is his four-point plan for peace and prosperity in Palestine. Decades of conflict have taken their toll on this region, around a quarter of Palestinians live in poverty. Economic growth has been stifled by wide ranging restrictions imposed by Israel. But it’s also been hindered by infighting between rival Palestinian political parties, Fatah and Hamas. Hope for unity came in October 2017, when Fatah and Hamas signed a peace deal. But such pacts in the past have collapsed. Now, Mr Masri wants the Israelis to decide if they can live in peace alongside Palestine. Decades of peace talks have failed. Palestinians have also been criticised for their indecision. But the peace process is expected to start again when President Trump unveils a new plan in January 2018. While he’s waiting to see what the Israelis bring to the table, Mr Masri wants to improve the Palestinian’s quality of life. People in Gaza live with severe water shortages and receive only a few hours of electricity per day. A recent UN report described conditions in Gaza as almost unliveable. Mr Masri is inviting foreign investment into Gaza and the West Bank, to rebuild infrastructure and boost the economy. But to realise his dream of a flourishing, prosperous Palestine, Mr Masri has one final point in his plan. Changing Palestine’s image. Decades of fighting have sapped the hopes and dreams of many Palestinians, meaning they fail to reach their full potential. With this four-point plan, Mr Masri hopes he’ll live to see Palestine back on its feet. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2ATg69L Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2AV9IhV Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2ATg8hT Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2ATg8OV Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2ATg9SZ
Views: 36199 The Economist
15 Reasons Why Women Earn Less Money Than Men
 
13:09
15 Reasons Why Women Earn Less Money Than Men | SUBSCRIBE to ALUX: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNjPtOCvMrKY5eLwr_-7eUg?sub_confirmation=1 Sacrifices to make if you want to be RICH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PND7QS4dia0 In this Alux.com video we'll try to answer the following questions: Do women earn less than men do? Are women paid less than Men for the same work? How much less are women being paid than men? Why are women paid less than men? Why do women earn less than men? Is the pay gap between men and women real? Which studies prove that women are paid less than men? Why are so little women in STEM fields? What are the reasons why women are paid less than men? What can women do to be paid equally to men? Why don't women ask for a raise? Do women work as many hours as men? How many holidays do women take per year? Does having a baby affect your career? Is it true that women are paid less than men for the same job? #alux #paygap #money WATCH MORE VIDEOS ON ALUX.COM! Most Expensive Things: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ay0u3dJRZas&list=PLP35LyTOQVIu4tNnitmhUqIjySwUhfOyl Luxury Cars: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5GhenZZs1k&index=1&list=PLP35LyTOQVItrVHGzdB9KY-Sbjq4gU-Ym Becoming a Billionaire: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Skwfwf2SNpw&index=6&list=PLP35LyTOQVIsO8kOTx8-YOgwkGvrPtJ3M World's Richest: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAy_G-1JF74&index=1&list=PLP35LyTOQVIvthSKr0S3JdjWw3qA9foBa Inspiring People: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMjO3Gg45pM&list=PLP35LyTOQVItaKCX5o3yaje6_H9D-GuEM Travel the World: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Blsz2JbdgM&t=2s&index=23&list=PLP35LyTOQVIt823Sy_C3-166RLzONbw6W Dark Luxury: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ch7JWVk8Ldk&index=6&list=PLP35LyTOQVIvQU6lzpW5_lryMmdB6zncU Celebrity Videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuhPRVdDli0&list=PLP35LyTOQVIuJuINlyvSU2VvP6pk9zjUk Businesses & Brands: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xr2YdBz2uWk&list=PLP35LyTOQVIv0fNwEgqmkrDd9d9Nkl7dz - Follow us on INSTAGRAM for amazing visual inspiration: https://www.instagram.com/alux/ & Don't miss the latest Luxury News only on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ealuxe --- Alux.com is the largest community of luxury & fine living enthusiasts in the world. We are the #1 online resource for ranking the most expensive things in the world and frequently refferenced in publications such as Forbes, USAToday, Wikipedia and many more, as the GO-TO destination for luxury content! Our website: https://www.alux.com is the largest social network for people who are passionate about LUXURY! Join today! SUBSCRIBE so you never miss another video: https://goo.gl/KPRQT8 -- To see how rich is your favorite celebrity go to: https://www.alux.com/networth/ -- For businesses inquiries we're available at: https://www.alux.com/contact/
Views: 68075 Alux.com
Obesity: not just a rich-world problem | The Economist
 
03:15
Obesity is a global problem, but more people are getting fatter in developing countries than anywhere else. If current trends continue, obese children will soon outnumber those who are undernourished. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2rAAQPL People are fatter than ever. Obesity has more than doubled since 1980. But the biggest rise is in the developing world. Anyone with a body mass index, or BMI, over 30 is considered obese. The higher your BMI, the greater your risk of developing weight-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease. Nearly half of the world’s overweight and obese children under five years old, live in Asia. And in Africa, the number of overweight children under five has increased by nearly 50% since 2000. Hunger still blights many parts of the world. But the share of people who do not have enough to eat is in decline. Globally one in nine people in the world suffer from chronic undernourishment. One in ten are obese. If current trends continue, the share of obese children in the world will surpass the number of undernourished by 2022. Africa has the fastest-growing middle class in the world. A move from traditional foods to high-calorie fast food and a more sedentary lifestyle is driving the rise in obesity. Fast food outlets like KFC and McDonalds have seen rapid growth on the continent. Women appear to be most affected. More than half of women in Botswana are overweight. Ethiopia known for its terrible famine, has seen obesity rates in women rise by 600% since 1984. Health systems in Africa, more focused on treating malnourishment and diseases like malaria and HIV, are ill equipped to deal with obesity-related illnesses like heart disease and diabetes. Pacific islands have the highest obesity rates in the world, thanks to the spread of western fast food. Diets which a generation ago consisted of fish and coconuts are now dominated by processed meat. Nauru is top of the list. 61% of the population are obese, making this tiny paradise island the world’s fattest nation. Cook Islands take second place, with an obesity rate of 56% and Marshall Islands come in third, with 53%. The Middle East is also in the grip of an obesity crisis. In the Saudi Arabia and Qatar and Kuwait more than a third of the population is obese. Obesity is already a global epidemic and is rapidly spreading from the rich world to the poor. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2rAhytv Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2rxBQ7e Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2rAARmN Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2rFj260 Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2rAASHn
Views: 49398 The Economist
What could threaten Amazon’s empire? | The Economist
 
02:30
Amazon accounts for more than half of every dollar spent online in America and is the world's leading provider of cloud computing. But can the company avoid the attention of the regulators? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 This week we put Amazon on the cover. Amazon is a remarkable company but what's extraordinary about it is the scale of its ambitions. Its shareholders expect it to grow faster for longer than any big company in modern business history and we asked whether it can do so. More than half of every new online dollar that's spent in America goes to Amazon. It's already the world's biggest cloud computing firm; it's set to spend more on TV investments than HBO, a big cable channel, next year. Amazon's success is built on two things in particular. One is its willingness to think about the long term - in an era when chief executives complain about the pressure to deliver results on a quarterly basis, Jeff Bezos, Amazon's founder and chief executive, thinks in terms of years and decades. It's expressly been part of its business model to take the cash that it earns and to invest it in order to take advantage of what it calls network effect, the idea is that more users you attract to its e-commerce site the more attractive it is to other retailers and therefore the more users come on to the site. Its bet is that if you invest hard for the long term the rewards will be enormous. The other thing that distinguishes Amazon is the span of its activities. It's no longer right to think about Amazon as a retailer. In its filings it lists as competitors everyone from media companies to food manufacturers, social networks to logistics firms. It is a conglomerate that spreads across all commerce. The amazing thing about Amazon is that it could well achieve investors expectations for it, but if it does then it could run into a problem, and that problem is the regulators. At the moment antitrust enforcers don't particularly worry about Amazon. It's not even the biggest retailer in America, it's most mature market. But if it gets as big as shareholders expect it to then they may start to look at it and not just because of antitrust rules but also because it will become a kind of utility for commerce. Lots of competitors will rely on it for services. Renting warehouses, for example, paying for goods, and that dependence on Amazon could be a reason for the government to look at it more closely and with that it's business maybe threatened. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films every day of the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 63672 The Economist
Sexism and the English language | The Economist
 
03:12
Sexism is rife in language. A woman may be described as “bossy”, while a man is more likely to be “assertive”. The Economist's language expert Lane Greene explores the gender stereotypes used in everyday speech. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2xvTLy8 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2xvU2RG Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2xvTMSI Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2xFoeKe Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2xvTNWM
Views: 84235 The Economist
Is the pope head of the world's most powerful government? | The Economist
 
05:01
Is the pope head of the world's most powerful government? The pope represents over one billion people, his government has a permanent presence at the United Nations and he runs the oldest diplomatic service on earth. We asked the man behind the Vatican's foreign policy to explain how the world's smallest country could house the world's most influential government Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2G6zUG5 Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2G6zVK9 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2G8KyfS Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2G8MEvS Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2G7lTrW Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2G5WIpA
Views: 162452 The Economist
Women and the Saudi revolution | The Economist
 
07:33
Saudi Arabia is one of the most conservative countries in the world. But a social revolution has begun. The Economist's editor, Zanny Minton Beddoes takes a road-trip around Riyadh to examine what a more moderate Saudi would mean for its women, and the rest of the world. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2zc9nHO Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2zg5DVw Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2z9xI0Z Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2zg5FwC Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2zg5G3E Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2zbI6VU
Views: 200950 The Economist
Religion, faith and the role they play today | The Economist
 
02:39
Religion and faith are an integral part of people’s lives worldwide. But in many countries the number of people who believe in God is in decline. We examine the changing role of religion around the world Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 The majority of Americans believe in God. But it’s a different story in Britain where, in 2009, people of no religion outnumbered Christian’s for the first time. And it’s not the only country where religion is in decline. In Israel, only 39% of the population consider themselves a religious person. In Norway it’s 30%, in Japan just 13%. But China surpasses them all. Only 9% of Chinese people report themselves as being religious and the majority say they are committed atheists, making China the least religious country in the world. But how reliable are the polls in China? The communist government is officially atheist and religious freedom is restricted in the country. So it’s likely that many Chinese people, who hold religious beliefs, do not report it. But, globally the picture is very different. 84% of the world’s population say they are affiliated to a religious group. Around 7% are Buddhist. 15% are Hindu. 24% are Muslim. But the largest religious group are Christian, making up nearly a third of the world’s 7.5 billion people. But this is set to change. It’s predicted there will be almost as many Muslim’s as Christians by 2050. This is because Muslims on average are younger than members of other religions, and they have more children. This has made Islam the fastest growing religion in the world. The religious profile of the world is changing, but even in areas where religious affiliation is declining, spirituality is not. America has become less religious in recent years, but the percentage of non-religious Americans who say they often feel spiritual has risen. Globally 15% of atheists believe in life after death - So if faith deserts you here, there’s always the hereafter. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 46417 The Economist
Should we tax the rich more? | The Economist
 
02:25
Taxation is necessary in order to provide public services like roads, education and health care. But as the world's elderly population grows, and the demand for public services increases, countries will need to reassess how they tax. Where should the money come from? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2tk2YnG Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2tk2YUI Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2tk2ZrK Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2tlqm4f Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2tlqmBh Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2tk31zS
Views: 87403 The Economist
Electric cars will come of age in 2018 | The Economist
 
06:18
Electric cars will come of age in 2018. For the first time they will compete in price and performance with petrol and diesel cars. But in the year ahead we will also be confronted with some uncomfortable truths about going electric. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 2018 is set to be the year the world fully embraces the electric car. We’ll see a global tipping point for drivers as electric models start competing with petrol and diesel cars head-to-head. But we’ll also be confronted with the uncomfortable truth about the impact of going electric. They've long been vaunted as the vehicle of the future but from laughing stock in the mid-1980s to rising stock today electric cars have come of age. Companies are clambering to take the lead with billions in investments and promises to make the switch, but it’s pressure from governments that's driving this push from the industry. It's an unlikely country that's leading the pack. In 2016 China brought more than 40 percent of the world's electric cars. These fume free cars will make our cities cleaner but uncomfortable truths lurk behind the electric car revolution. The rise of electric cars will challenge the world's thirst for oil. It could spark a global shift of power from countries that have enjoyed the influence that oil has bought. Beyond oil, attention will turn to lithium electric car batteries which rely on the mineral Cobalt. Two thirds of the world's cobalt comes from one country, the Democratic Republic of Congo. Demand for cobalt has doubled over the past five years and is set to triple by 2020. But the electric car revolution is coming. After 2018 there will be no turning back. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 473158 The Economist
Equal Pay day - Gender wage gap in Germany | Business Brief
 
02:54
A labor market study last week found that German women are paid 22 percent less on average than their male counterparts. More Business Information and Videos: http://www.dw.de/business-brief
Views: 1224 DW News
The gender gap in Japan | The Economist
 
04:27
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has a radical plan to boost his economy: boost the woeful rate of women in leadership positions. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 96487 The Economist
Why I Won't Call Myself A Feminist: It's Hypocrisy
 
04:20
Why won't I call myself a feminist? Because third-wave feminism isn't progress. It's hypocrisy. Visit theblaze.com/allie for more.
Views: 509854 BlazeTV
What stands in the way of women being equal to men? BBC News
 
43:36
Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews 'All That Stands In The Way' is a BBC documentary following the lives of four teenage girls in Jordan, Lesotho, Iceland & UK in an effort to understand the roots of gender inequality. There is no country in the world where men and women are equal. Contact reporter Ros Atkins on Twitter @BBCRosAtkins. Subscribe http://www.youtube.com/bbcnews Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews
Views: 305744 BBC News
There Is No Gender Wage Gap
 
05:30
Is there a gender wage gap? Are women paid less than men to do the same work? Christina Hoff Sommers, Resident Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, explains the data. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Have you taken the pledge for school choice? Click here! http://www.schoolchoicenow.com Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: If, for the same work, women make only 77 cents for every dollar a man makes, why don’t businesses hire only women? Wages are the biggest expense for most businesses. So, hiring only women would reduce costs by nearly a quarter – and that would go right to the bottom line. Don’t businesses want to be profitable? Or, are they just really bad at math? Well, actually, it’s the feminists, celebrities and politicians spreading this wage gap myth who have the math problem. Here’s why: The 77-cents-on-the-dollar statistic is calculated by dividing the median earnings of all women working full-time by the median earnings of all men working full-time. In other words, if the average income of all men is, say, 40,000 dollars a year, and the average annual income of all women is, say, 30,800 dollars, that would mean that women earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. 30,800 divided by 40,000 equals .77. But these calculations don’t reveal a gender wage injustice because it doesn’t take into account occupation, position, education or hours worked per week. Even a study by the American Association of University Women, a feminist organization, shows that the actual wage gap shrinks to only 6.6 cents when you factor in different choices men and women make. And the key word here is “choice.” The small wage gap that does exist has nothing to do with paying women less, let alone with sexism; it has to do with differences in individual career choices that men and women make. In 2009, the U.S. Department of Labor released a paper that examined more than 50 peer-reviewed studies and concluded that the oft-cited 23 percent wage gap “may be almost entirely the result of individual choices being made by both male and female workers.” Well, let’s look at some of those choices. Georgetown University compiled a list of the five best-paying college majors, and the percentage of men or women majoring in those fields: Number 1 best-paying major: Petroleum Engineering: 87% male Number 2: Pharmaceutical Sciences: 48% male 3: Mathematics and Computer Science: 67% male 4: Aerospace Engineering: 88% male 5: Chemical Engineering: 72% male Notice that women out-represent men in only one of the five top-paying majors – by only a few percentage points. Now consider the same study’s list of the five worst paying college majors: Number 1: Counseling and Psychology: 74% female Number 2: Early Childhood Education: 97% female 3: Theology and Religious Vocations: 66% male 4: Human Services and Community Organization: 81% female 5: Social Work: 88% female Here, it’s the women who lead in all but one category. Even within the same profession, men and women make different career choices that impact how much money they make. Take nursing, where male nurses on the whole earn 18% more than female nurses. The reason? Male nurses gravitate to the best-paying nursing specialties, they work longer hours, and disproportionately find jobs in cities with the highest compensation. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/there-no-gender-wage-gap
Views: 5575257 PragerU
Nobel Prize-winning Economist Paul Krugman on Tax Reform, Trump, and Bitcoin
 
16:47
Business Insider recently caught up with Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman to talk taxes, Trump, and bitcoin. Krugman is skeptical about the effects of the Trump administration's tax plan. "Will workers see their wages increase in a way that anyone will notice over the next five years? No," he said. He expressed concern about some of the candidates for the Fed board, such as Marvin Goodfriend. Krugman said any disruption of NAFTA could be a "hugely costly thing." He also said that bitcoin is an obvious bubble. -------------------------------------------------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1W9Lk0n Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ -------------------------------------------------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 221090 Money Insider
Is the gender pay gap a myth?
 
04:37
The Wright Stuff panel discuss whether gender pay gaps really are discriminatory towards women with think tank expert Kate Andrews, who claims other factors like experience, time out for children and a reluctance to demand pay rises are to blame. The Wright Stuff is on television every weekday at 9:15am until 11:15am, Channel 5. To watch full episodes, visit https://www.my5.tv/the-wright-stuff/season-2018 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/officialwrightstuff/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/5WrightStuff Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5wrightstuff/ #wrightstuff
Foreign aid: who gives the most, and where does it go? | The Economist
 
02:01
Rich countries are giving more in foreign aid than ever before. But which countries are the most generous? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2AAzFCG Rich countries are giving away more in aid than at any other time on record. In 2016 more than $140bn was distributed around the world. According to the latest breakdown in 2015 America gave the most money away - nearly $31bn to at least 40 countries and organisations such as the world bank. This included $770m to Pakistan and $250m to Mexico. This may sound generous but the United States has the largest economy in the world. American foreign aid spending in 2015 was only 0.17% of the gross national income. Far less than other rich countries. Sweden and Norway are the biggest givers, donating over 1% of their gross national income to foreign aid. The biggest receivers of aid in 2015 were Afghanistan, India, Vietnam, Ethiopia and Indonesia. Afghanistan received $3.8bn and India $3.1bn. Despite being the second biggest economy in the world, China received $1.5bn in development aid in 2015. This included around $750m from Germany and $67m from Britain. The total amount of foreign aid is at an all time high - up 9% in 2016. This is largely down to the generosity of six countries who meet or exceed the United Nations foreign aid target, donating more than 0.7% of gross national income. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2AAzGGK Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2AAzIym Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2AAzKpY Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2ACXABp Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2AEbeEw
Views: 114000 The Economist
The Truth About the Gender Pay Gap
 
14:54
--A critical look at the gender pay gap; addressing the "77 cents on the dollar" claim and the claim that there is no pay gap at all On the Bonus Show: Fierce wind causes damage in Chicago, a new Nerf gun shoots at 68 mph, the healing power of mead, more... Support TDPS by clicking (bookmark it too!) this link before shopping on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/?tag=thedavpaksho-20 Website: https://www.davidpakman.com Become a Member: https://www.davidpakman.com/membership David's Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/david.pakman Discuss This on Reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/thedavidpakmanshow/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/davidpakmanshow TDPS Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/davidpakmanshow David's Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dpakman TDPS Gear: http://www.davidpakman.com/gear 24/7 Voicemail Line: (219)-2DAVIDP Subscribe to The David Pakman Show for more: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=midweekpolitics Timely news is important! We upload new clips every day, 6-8 stories! Make sure to subscribe! Broadcast on February 22, 2016 --Donate via Bitcoin: 15evMNUN1g4qdRxywbHFCKNfdCTjxtztfj --Donate via Ethereum: 0xe3E6b538E1CD21D48Ff1Ddf2D744ea8B95Ba1930 --Donate via Litecoin: LhNVT9j5gQj8U1AbwLzwfoc5okDoiFn4Mt --Donate via Bitcoin: 15evMNUN1g4qdRxywbHFCKNfdCTjxtztfj --Donate via Ethereum: 0xe3E6b538E1CD21D48Ff1Ddf2D744ea8B95Ba1930 --Donate via Litecoin: LhNVT9j5gQj8U1AbwLzwfoc5okDoiFn4Mt
Views: 47654 David Pakman Show
Why does time pass? | The Economist
 
10:30
The equations of physics suggest time should be able to go backwards as well as forwards. Experience suggests, though, that it cannot. Why? And is time travel really possible? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Why does time pass? It is a question so profound that few people would even think to ask it. Yet its effects are all around. Human beings live in a perpetual present, inexorably sealed off from the past, but moving relentlessly into the future. For most people, time seems to be something that is just out there. A thing ticking away in the background - fixed, immutable. Time seems to go in one direction and in one direction only. But physicists see it much differently. One of the great minds who changed the way science thinks about time was Albert Einstein. In 1905 he published his special theory of relativity. In it he demonstrated that time passes differently in different places depending on how those places are moving with respect to one another. Einstein showed that the faster one travels the slower time goes for the traveler. At the speeds at which humans move this is imperceptible. But for someone traveling on a spaceship at speeds close to that of light, time would slow down compared with its passage for people on earth. There was another important aspect of Einstein's theory which he didn't even realize when he published it. That time was woven into the very fabric of space itself. Einstein used this insight to help develop his general theory of relativity which incorporated gravity. He published it in 1915. With the general theory of relativity he demonstrated that massive objects warped the fabric of space-time. It is this curvature that causes time to slow down near them. Time slows down in proportion to the gravitational pull of a nearby object so the effect would be strong near a black hole but milder near the earth. But even here it can be detected. Einstein's theories had to be taken into account when the GPS system was set up otherwise it would have been inaccurate. One scientist who puzzled over the directionality of time was Arthur Eddington, a 20th century astronomer who defined the concept of the arrow of time, based on observations made by the 19th century physicist Ludwig Boltzmann. The arrow of time is based on the second law of thermodynamics which says the disorder known as entropy increases with time. For example, a building left untouched will slowly decay into its surroundings. It will disintegrate into a more chaotic state but it is highly unlikely that the building will become more orderly over time - this is because there are many more ways for a system to be disorderly than orderly. There can be many ways for something to break for instance but only one way for it to be put back together again. A system will be less disordered in the past and more disordered in the future. This is the arrow of time. So how can the arrow of time be reconciled with Einstein's equations? If time can go forwards and backwards according to relativity does that mean it's possible to go backwards in time? The theory of relativity does allow time travel to the future. Einstein's theories do allow for the formation of wormholes in space. These are shortcuts that link otherwise distant places in the space-time continuum. Although wormholes are theoretically possible they're a highly implausible proposition. That's because the equations suggest enormous masses and energies would be required to create and manipulate one. What remains then is a mystery. Theory fails to forbid traveling backwards in time but practice suggests it might just as well be forbidden. For now it would appear the arrow of time cannot be reversed. No one knows why time passes but it seems that no matter how people look at it, it goes in one direction in one direction only. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6
Views: 2625194 The Economist
John Stossel - The Gender Pay Gap
 
10:36
Feminist author Martha Burk ("Cult of Power"), educator Warren Farrell ("Why Men Earn More") and Sabrina Schaeffer of the Independent Women's Forum discuss the reasons men are often paid more than women. http://www.LibertyPen.com
Views: 36954 LibertyPen
Women with Different Salaries on Anxiety about Money | Glamour
 
02:51
We surveyed anonymous New York women with different salaries and asked them what the biggest anxiety money caused them. Still haven’t subscribed to Glamour on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/2gYlQqe Women with Different Salaries on Anxiety about Money | Glamour
Views: 522423 Glamour
Trump in two minutes | The Economist
 
02:48
President Donald Trump has spent one year in office. But what exactly has he achieved? Here’s a two-minute snapshot of his presidency so far. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2D5Gxte Since coming to power Mr Trump has tweeted over two thousand times. Often insulting people and bragging with a liberal use of exclamation marks. He's played golf 88 times, held very long handshakes and created a new word "covfefe". Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2D5Gy0g Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2D5FNUY Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2D1WFMn Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2D5FPw4 Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2D5FQQE
Views: 220899 The Economist
Do Women Believe in the Wage Gap?
 
05:01
Do women believe the wage gap is real? Will Witt went to California State University, Northridge to see what they think. Check it out! Follow Will Witt on social media: @thewillwitt
Views: 564673 PragerU
Jennifer Lawrence discusses pay inequality with Charlie Rose
 
02:24
A year after a hack at Sony Pictures revealed female movie stars were paid significantly less than their male counterparts, Jennifer Lawrence discussed her own role in the gender pay gap with Charlie Rose.
Views: 7912 CBSN
World Cup pay gap: Here's why it's justified | FACTUAL FEMINIST
 
05:41
Critics are up in arms about the World Cup gender gap. The prize money for women is far less than for men. Commentators attribute the gap to sexism and structural inequities. Could they be right? Let’s review the evidence. Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideo... Like Factual Feminist on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thefactualfe... Follow Factual Feminist on Twitter https://twitter.com/chsommers For more Information https://goo.gl/ChiQYD Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. #politics #news #government #education #feminism #feminist #soccer #worldcup #worldcup2014 #sport #sports © American Enterprise Institute Partial Transcript: This summer, the U.S. women’s soccer team electrified the nation when it defeated Germany 2–0 and then Japan 5–2 to win the World Cup. Instead of celebrating the team’s brilliant play and the continuing growth of women’s soccer, many in the media are fixating on what they see as a shameful “World Cup pay gap.” The U.S. women’s team collected only $2 million in prize money for its victory over Japan. But for the corresponding men’s competition in 2014, the winning German team won $35 million—while the Americans, who lost in the first round, took home $8 million. Spurred by the media reports, Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont introduced a resolution on the floor of the U.S. Senate urging FIFA, the organization that sponsors the World Cup, to “immediately eliminate gender pay inequity”: Here is where I think the Senator and the media critics go wrong. The prize disparity has much more to do with sports economics than sexism. The World Cup is a world competition—hence its title—and its prizes are based on paid viewership, in stadiums but mainly on television, the world over. The women’s players are formidable athletes and the Women’s World Cup is growing rapidly in popularity, especially in the U.S., but it’s still nowhere near the men’s cup in terms of world popularity. According to FIFA, the 2011 Women’s World Cup was watched by nearly 408 million people around the world; for the men’s World Cup in, 2010 the figure was 3.2 billion. In 2010, the men’s World Cup generated nearly $3.7 billion in revenue, while the women’s World Cup generated about $73 million. FIFA is a shady organization, and sexism can probably be counted among its many vices—but the differences in its men’s and women’s prizes are actually less than the differences in its revenues from the two competitions. Well, the sports equity activists have heard all of this before, and they have a reply. “Why accept market forces?” they ask. After all, these forces were shaped by a culture that has been traditionally hostile to women. Shane Ferro, a feminist business reporter at Business Insider explains it this way: “Most of us have been socialized to accept men’s sports as dominant, and somehow automatically more interesting.” And once society internalizes a falsehood, she says, “it’s not so easy to correct it.” Hard, but not impossible. There is now a call by sports equity activists to change the market by re-socializing fans. “Sports fans, for the most part, will watch whatever you put in front of them,” says Kavitha Davidson at Bloomberg News. Highlight the women’s teams, and fan interest and excitement will come. A recently published study by two feminist sociologists [SHOW] comes to the same conclusion. The authors lament that women’s sports receive only about 3% of network TV attention, down from 5% in 1989. Major sports media, they say, is a “place set up by men for men to celebrate men’s sensational athletic accomplishments” while giving short shrift to women’s achievements. They acknowledge that there are fewer female teams, so they suggest for now the media increase coverage of women’s sports to 12–18%. They also specify that the sportscasters should report on women’s sports with the same “enthusiasm” as men’s sports. More coverage plus more enthusiasm will increase the fan base, and that will drive up women’s salaries and prizes. Well, it’s the gender sociologists and the feminist journalists—not the sports fans— who have internalized a falsehood. There are athletic competitions where women attract more fans than men—figure skating and gymnastics, for example. And women’s tennis, while not as popular as men’s, certainly has a large and devoted audience. #aei #news #politics #government #education #feminism #feminist
Putin's games with the West | The Economist
 
07:40
As presidential elections take place in Russia, chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov talks about the games President Putin is playing with the West. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2GBpCOs Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2GDXPxf Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2GBpEpy Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2GAgvxK Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2GBpEWA Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2GBpFtC
Views: 346917 The Economist
Oil and gas companies are facing major technological disruption
 
14:49
Pressure to reduce carbon emissions is putting the future of fossil fuel giants in jeopardy. Their survival plans involve carbon storage and floating wind farms. Meanwhile, one small German village is showing how large companies aren't always essential. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Over 80% of the world's energy needs are provided by coal, oil and gas. Although technologies to extract fossil fuels may have changed over the decades, the core products themselves have never been challenged. Until now. Pressure to reduce carbon emissions is putting the future of fossil fuel giants in jeopardy. Encouraging the growth of alternative methods to generate and distribute power. In just eight years, the value of the world's biggest power companies has halved. Leaving industry giants scrambling to redefine their role in this new energy world. Across the world, old industries are facing disruption on an unprecedented scale. The pressure to adapt has never been greater. Known as the Paris Accord, 195 countries agreed to a legally binding climate deal to reduce carbon emissions. This 5 trillion dollar industry may be facing a seismic shift but that doesn't mean it's ready to ditch the dirty fossil fuels that made it rich. Instead, many companies are banking on new methods to clean up an old process. Norwegian oil and gas giant, Statoil, struck it rich in the North Sea in the late 1960s. Over four decades later, at its Sleipner gas rig, the company is attempting to make fossil fuel production cleaner. Statoil's business still relies on the harmful burning of fossil fuels by its customers but at least the company is trying to reduce its own carbon footprint. It's transformed some of its offshore rigs with technology that enables engineers to separate the carbon dioxide and pump it underground. Statoil's Sleipner gas rig is the world's first offshore carbon capture storage plant. Each year, Statoil stores 1 million tonnes of CO2 making extraction less carbon intensive. They believe that prioritising gas over more harmful fossil fuels will further reduce global warming and keep them relevant for decades to come. Wind and solar are cleaner but depend on subsidies. To take on the consistency of fossil fuels they face a huge challenge - The unpredictable weather. In Bavaria, a tiny village has used those subsidies to take up the challenge. This community believes it's found a way to produce a steady energy supply just from renewable sources, raising the real prospect of a future free from fossil fuels. Norbert and Kristina Bechteler's family farm has been providing the local community with dairy products for over 200 years but they now have a new income from solar energy. Producing your own energy with solar panels isn't revolutionary but in this village, they're combining solar with other renewables in an attempt to achieve the Holy Grail of a steady energy supply. And they're prepared to use anything to do it. The Deputy Mayor has helped drive the village's pioneering efforts to make renewable energy a realistic option. There's one renewable that never disappears as it can be sourced from the decay of virtually any organic matter and it's called biogas. Of the four biogas plants in the village, Farmer Einsiedler runs the largest. Combining these different sources has been so successful the village now generates five times more energy than it needs. But that is just part of the challenge of turning renewables into a credible energy supply. The Disrupters is an original series exploring how major industries – from music and cars to hospitality – are currently being disrupted by the latest wave of digital innovation. As well as enjoying privileged access into the world biggest tech start ups we show how industry giants respond when faced with such tech-driven innovation - do they adapt - or die? Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6
Views: 672013 The Economist
The best place to be a woman? | The Economist
 
06:11
In the battle for gender equality Iceland is leading the world. The tiny island is pioneering news ways to close the gender pay gap, root out stereotypes and get more mothers back to work. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Supported by Mishcon de Reya Today women around the globe have less access to power wealth and education than men - but one tiny island is leading the world in bridging these gaps. Iceland is pioneering ways to get more mothers back to work, to root out gender stereotypes, and to close the pay gap. Could Iceland inspire the world to solve one of its greatest problems? Iceland has topped gender equality rankings for nearly a decade. One of the secrets to their success? Start early. This kindergarten in the capital Reykjavik focuses on challenging extreme gender stereotypes before they take root in boys and girls. It's a mission that's led to the creation of 17 schools across this tiny country - all focused on developing a healthy balance of characteristics in both sexes. Girls and boys are separated to allow girls to nurture traits traditionally viewed as masculine, like being bold, independent, and taking risks. And boys are given time to learn traits traditionally viewed as feminine, like being more group oriented, empathetic, and caring - and the signs are that this is working. Research suggests that in later years children from this school have a greater understanding of gender equality when compared to children from other schools. Iceland is also promoting gender equality by encouraging fathers to share the childcare burden with mothers. In 2000, it introduced what is known as a daddy quota - three month statutory paternity leave. It's an allowance that goes much further than most other countries in the world. Here over 70% of fathers take up the full three months leave. Why? Because the state covers 80% of a salary during this period up to a cap of $4,600 a month. One beneficiary of this generous system is Egill Bjarnson who is looking after his son Valer. Egill believes the high cost of the daddy quota to taxpayers is justified because it helps get more women into work. But even in Iceland men are still paid nearly 6% more than women for similar work. This year Iceland became the first country in the world to pass legislation not just to expose but to tackle the gender pay gap. Companies with over 25 employees like Reykjavik Energy now have to prove they are paying men and women equally for similar jobs. Every job at the company must be measured against a set of criteria - this produces a score. For jobs with the same score workers must be paid the same. When Reykjavik Energy used this pay calculator the inequalities came into sharp and immediate focus. The company rectified this by raising the wages of its female employees. Critics of the law point out there will be significant financial consequences for companies as they rectify their pay inequalities - but many argue this is a necessary price to pay. Gender equality will be an ever more pressing challenge for wealthy countries across the world. Could the ambitious measures being tested in Iceland provide practical solutions? What are the forces shaping how people live and work and how power is wielded in the modern age? NOW AND NEXT reveals the pressures, the plans and the likely tipping points for enduring global change. Understand what is really transforming the world today – and discover what may lie in store tomorrow. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 252075 The Economist
The Balfour Declaration's impact, 100 years on | The Economist
 
08:03
The Balfour Declaration was penned 100 years ago, but its legacy still resonates in the Middle East today. How did a letter, only 67-words long, ignite 100 years of conflict? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 100 years ago this week Arthur Balfour, the British foreign secretary, penned a letter that would change the face of the Middle East. The letter published on November 2nd 1917 led to the creation of the State of Israel and would spark almost a century of conflict. The American Colony Hotel has hosted guests in Jerusalem for over a century. This place has a unique perspective on the region's history because it's played a part in it. Presidents and peacemakers, spies and journalists, use this space, often in secret, to hatch plans and discuss the future. The hotel sits close to the former border separating East from West Jerusalem. Today, the whole city is under Israeli rule but Jews and Arabs are still divided. This place is a haven from the troubles all around. Jeremy and Ahmad have both worked here for more than 30 years. Jeremy Berkovits is the hotel's chief financial officer. He is an Israeli. Ahmad Shakarneh is the head of housekeeping. He is a Palestinian. Balfour's letter has had a profound impact on both of these men. They live on opposite sides of Israel's security barrier. The letter’s crucial clause read “His Majesty's Government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people”. But it also warned “it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-jewish communities in Palestine”. Here in the hotels archive Jeremy and Ahmad view the letters legacy very differently. The letter was a declaration of support for Zionists who wanted to create a Jewish state. In the carve up of the Ottoman Empire after the First World War the League of Nations gave Britain a mandate to rule Palestine. But the Arabs who had been living in Palestine for centuries turned increasingly to resistance and violence, culminating in a revolt in 1936. As they crushed the uprising, the British tried to win over the Arabs by restricting Jewish ambitions. Jewish anger also turned violent. The British gave up and handed the problem over to the United Nations. In 1947, the UN voted to partition Palestine - but the Arabs rejected this and fighting broke out. As the last British soldiers left Palestine in May 1948, the moment had come for the Jews. They declared the State of Israel. Neighbouring Arab countries invaded immediately. In the armistice of 1949, Israel and Arab states divided up the land but there was no Palestinian state, just two regions controlled by Egypt and Jordan, now known as the West Bank and Gaza. An estimated 700,000 Palestinians fled or were pushed out of their homes. They called this the Nakba - the Catastrophe. Since then there have been wars, uprisings, terrorist attacks and diplomatic deals. Nothing has brought lasting peace or a State for the Palestinians. Since the war of 1967, many Palestinians now live in the West Bank under permanent Israeli occupation, cut off by the Israeli security barrier. They have autonomy in big cities and towns but are surrounded by Jewish settlements. Others are locked away in the Gaza Strip the scene of repeated wars. A century on from Lord Balfour's letter his 67 words have left a profound but mixed legacy. The conflict between Arab and Jew remains intractable. The Balfour Declaration helped to create Israel, but the state of Palestine is not yet born Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 158950 The Economist

Programme partner microsoft download
Foojee mobcrush for windows
Shell for windows 10
Freesat pci card windows 7
Windows 7 negative colors